Strawberries and Cream Broth Pops

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I was a little skeptical when I first heard the idea of of putting broth in an ice block, so I was pleasantly surprised when I made these for the first time. My kids loved them and they have no hint of brothy taste. They’ve also got Kultured Wellness Coconut Yoghurt for added probiotics.

I made these with dehydrated chicken broth from Broth of Life, which is super handy to keep in the cupboard when I haven’t made broth. You can also substitue 1/2 cup of chicken broth. 

Coconut Kefir

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Coconut kefir is a super refreshing bubbly drink with a hint of tang. It’s got a much milder taste than kombucha and is higher in probiotics (27 billion Colony Forming Units (CFU) per cup).

It’s made with the Kultured Wellness Kefir Starter which is high potency and ideal for gut healing and rebuilding. These cultures have become a staple in my kitchen. I like to think of them as a quick, easy way of getting high quality therapeutic strength probiotics into my family’s diet.

To read more about the Kultured Wellness cultures click here.

FAQ’S

How long does it last?

The kefir will last six months in the fridge or freezer.

It’s been 48 hours and my kefir still tastes like coconut water what should I do?

Transfer to a warmer spot and keep tasting until the sweetness has gone and there is a slight tang. It may take up to a week to ferment in cooler temperatures.

My kefir isn’t fizzy is this normal?

As long as your kefir tastes fermented and not just like coconut water than this is normal. If you want to encourage more fizz ensure you use an air tight bottle to ferment or try flavouring it.

How much should I have per day?

Start slowly and gradually build up your intake until it feels good. Adults start with a quarter of a cup and build up to one to three cups per day. Kids start with one teaspoon and build up to half a cup per day.

Why do I have to start with a new starter after five batches?

These cultures are therapeutic-strength probiotics that contain only specific beneficial strains. The more you ferment them the less potent they become. Each time you do a batch, your ferment is exposed to bacteria and yeasts from the surrounding environment (in your kitchen and the air) and on your equipment (jars and utensils). Overtime these strains can compromise the diversity and strength of the culture, essentially turning it into a wild ferment without the original therapeutic value.

Where can I purchase a kefir culture?

You can purchase the Kultured Wellness Kefir Culture Starter online, through the Kultured Wellness website. You can receive 10% off with the code ‘CULTUREDBABY’.

Alternatively if you live on the Sunshine Coast, you can pick up a starter from my place in Coolum Beach. Please contact me to arrange.

For more resources, support, recipes and inspiration for using the Kultured Wellness cultures, I’d love you to join my private Facebook group - Cultured Baby Kultured Kitchen - click here to join. 

Coconut Yoghurt

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This yoghurt is thick, creamy and oh so easy to make. It’s made with the Kultured Wellness Coconut Yoghurt Starter which is super high potency and ideal for gut healing and rebuilding.

To read more about the Kultured Wellness cultures click here.

This is the first ferment I fed to Albee as a baby because of its extremely high probiotic count (41 billion CFU per cup - the average probiotic supplement contains 10-20 billion).

FAQ’S

How long does it last?

The yoghurt will last for six months in the fridge or freezer.

My yoghurt separated what should I do?

If your yoghurt separates this is completely normal, simply stir back together before serving.

How much should I have per day?

Start slowly and gradually build up your intake until you find the amount that feels good for you. Adults start with one to two tablespoons and kids one teaspoon and gradually build up from there.

Why do I have to start with a new starter after five batches?

These cultures are therapeutic-strength probiotics that contain only specific beneficial strains. The more you ferment them the less potent they become. Each time you do a batch, your ferment is exposed to bacteria and yeasts from the surrounding environment (in your kitchen and the air) and on your equipment (jars and utensils). Overtime these strains can compromise the diversity and strength of the culture, essentially turning it into a wild ferment without the original therapeutic value.

How do I transition my kids from regular yoghurt to this yoghurt?

Start slowly by gradually adding in a spoonful of the yoghurt to their regular yoghurt. Very slowly increase the amount of yoghurt until they become used to the flavour.
Try blending up the yoghurt with their favourite fruit – strawberries or banana usually go down well.
Add the yoghurt into smoothies, gummies or make an easy avocado dip with smashed avo, lemon juice, salt and pepper and some of the yoghurt.

Where can I purchase a yoghurt starter?

You can purchase the Kultured Wellness Yoghurt Starter online, through the Kultured Wellness website. You can receive 10% off with the code ‘CULTUREDBABY’.

Alternatively if you live on the Sunshine Coast, you can pick up a starter from my place in Coolum Beach. Please contact me to arrange.

For more resources, support, recipes and inspiration for using the Kultured Wellness cultures, I’d love you to join my private Facebook group - Cultured Baby Kultured Kitchen - click here to join. 

Semi-dried Tomato and Basil Cashew Cream Cheese

semi dired tomato and basil cashew cream cheese

Cultured cashew cream cheese is one of my favourite things to have in the fridge. The store bought ones can get pricey so I prefer to make my own, it’s super easy. I use it as a dip with crackers and veggies, dollop it on pizzas, veggies or just about anything. I love playing around with different flavour combinations and this is my latest.

This cream cheese has been fermented which means it will last longer, is easier to digest and is filled with good for your guts probiotics.

To make it fermented I fermented the cashews first, but if you need skip that part to speed up the process you can use regular cashews - I recommend soaking them for a few hours first to soften them up to make it easier to blend.



Top Deck Gummies

Gummies are one of my favourite gut friendly snacks to make. They are so easy to make and my kids love them - especially the two layered variety like these ‘top deck’ ones. The layers are a mix of cacao and coconut cream, with some added coconut yoghurt for a dose of probiotics. I use Kultured Wellness coconut yoghurt for its high probiotic count, but any variety of coconut yoghurt would work for this recipe.

To get the maximum benefits out of the gelatin ensure you use a good quality, grass fed variety from your health food store rather than the standard ones from the supermarket. My favourite brands to use are Great Lakes and Nutra Organics.

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Ginger and Turmeric Cold and Flu Gummies

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These are my favourite gummies to make when trying to fight off a cold. They are packed full of good stuff - turmeric, ginger, lemon, honey and coconut kefir to make for an anti inflammatory, immune boosting, good for your guts gummy.  

I make these especially for Anjali (my 2 and a half year old) and she loves them but if you don't like the flavour of turmeric you can adjust the amount of honey to suit.

I've been using Kultured Wellness cultures to make my coconut kefir but you can also substitute kombucha or water keeping in mind that if you use water you won't get the benefits of the probiotics. 

Fire Cider - Cold and Flu Tonic

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Fire cider is a traditional folk remedy for coughs, colds and sore throats made from onion, garlic, ginger, turmeric, lemon, herbs and apple cider vinegar. 

We use this as a tonic mixed with honey in the cooler months to prevent and fight off colds when they strike.

The original recipe is made with horseradish which can be hard to find unless you grow it yourself so you can substitute daikon, regular radish or leave it out completely. If you can get a hold of horseradish I would highly recommend adding it in as it takes the flavour to a whole new level and is extremely delicious!!

You can also add in chillies or jalapeños to give it an extra kick but I opted to leave them out this time to make it more kid friendly. 

Fermented Mustard

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Mustard is a super simple condiment to whip up. This fermented version takes one day to ferment and will last in the fridge for a couple of months. This mustard is stronger than your standard variety so a little bit really does go a long way. You can use it in salad dressings, sauces or straight up as a spread. 

Fermented Fruit Mince Tarts

Fruit mince pies are one of my favourite treats at Christmas but they are often filled with sugar, gluten and dairy (which doesn't agree with everyone). This is my version made with a fermented fruit mince, and a raw shortbread pastry. They are gluten free, dairy free and free of refined sugar. They are quite simple to make and don't require any cooking or heating but you do have to allow 1-2 days for the fruit mince to ferment. 

Once they are assembled you wouldn't even know you are eating something fermented and I guarantee the whole family will love them.

The recipe for the pastry was adapted from Ames Starr from Raw and Peace who makes the most amazing raw desserts.  

fruit mince tarts

Lacto-Fermented Mango and Ginger Chutney

mango and ginger chutney

This isn't your average chutney. Traditional chutneys are preserved with lots of sugar and vinegar. This one has no added sugar and is preserved by lacto-fermentation. This means it's full of healthy bacteria that are good for your gut. The down side is it won't keep for as long as your standard chutneys and will continue to ferment in the jar changing flavour as it goes. For this reason it is best consumed in 1-2 weeks. After that it will start to turn slightly alcoholic from the fermentation of fruit (it is still ok to eat but best hide it from the kids!).

This makes a delicious accompaniment to both sweet and savoury dishes. We use it more as a sweet topping and dollop it on porridge, pancakes and muffins. Experiment and see how you like it.  

Strawberry and Ginger Kombucha

strawberry and ginger kombucha

Strawberries make an awesome flavour for your second ferment and are guaranteed to get your kombucha fizzy (which so many people struggle with). The ginger balances out the sweetness of the strawberries and adds a nice punchy flavour.

To make this you will need one batch of finished plain kombucha and a 1 litre glass bottle with a tight seal. Grolsch style flip top bottles work well as does reusing store bought kombucha bottles. 

Coconut Yoghurt Panna Cotta

coconut yoghurt panna cotta

This recipe came about as a different way to get Anjali (my 22month old) to eat yoghurt. It's dairy free and is made with coconut yoghurt, coconut milk and grass fed beef gelatin (we use Great Lakes brand). It's good for your gut with probiotics (from the yoghurt) and gut healing properties from the gelatin.

This is a basic recipe to get you started but it's super versatile so feel free to change it up with different yoghurt, milk or even milk kefir. You can also jazz up the flavour with extra spices like cinnamon, cardamon, cloves or turmeric. 

Serve for breakfast with some fruit and granola or as a dessert or snack.